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Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. Check out some of the great books by authors of Asian and Pacific Islander descent that the NICC libraries have to offer!

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. Four mothers, four daughters, four families whose histories shift with the four winds depending on who's "saying" the stories. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, begin meeting to eat dim sum, play mahjong, and talk. United in shared unspeakable loss and hope, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Rather than sink into tragedy, they choose to gather to raise their spirits and money. "To despair was to wish back for something already lost. Or to prolong what was already unbearable." Forty years later the stories and history continue.

A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. As an Indian wedding gathers a family back together, parents Rafiq and Layla must reckon with the choices their children have made. There is Hadia: their headstrong, eldest daughter, whose marriage is a match of love and not tradition. Huda, the middle child, determined to follow in her sister’s footsteps. And lastly, their estranged son, Amar, who returns to the family fold for the first time in three years to take his place as brother of the bride. What secrets and betrayals have caused this close-knit family to fracture? Can Amar find his way back to the people who know and love him best?

Night Sky with Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong.  "In his haunting and fearless debut, Ocean Vuong walks a tightrope of historic and personal violences, creating an interrogation of the American body as a borderless space of both failure and triumph. At once vulnerable and redemptive, dreamlike and visceral, compassionate and unforgiving, these poems seek a myriad existence without forgetting the prerequisite of self-preservation in a world bent on extinguishing its othered voices. Vuong's poems show, through breath, cadence, and unrepentant enthrallment, that a gentle palm on a chest can calm the most necessary of hungers."

Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls by T. Kira Madden. Acclaimed literary essayist T Kira Madden's raw and redemptive debut memoir is about coming of age and reckoning with desire as a queer, biracial teenager amidst the fierce contradictions of Boca Raton, Florida, a place where she found cult-like privilege, shocking racial disparities, rampant white-collar crime, and powerfully destructive standards of beauty hiding in plain sight. As a child, Madden lived a life of extravagance, from her exclusive private school to her equestrian trophies and designer shoe-brand name. But under the surface was a wild instability. The only child of parents continually battling drug and alcohol addictions, Madden confronted her environment alone. Facing a culture of assault and objectification, she found lifelines in the desperately loving friendships of fatherless girls. With unflinching honesty and lyrical prose, spanning from 1960s Hawai'i to the present-day struggle of a young woman mourning the loss of a father while unearthing truths that reframe her reality, Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls is equal parts eulogy and love letter. It’s a story about trauma and forgiveness, about families of blood and affinity, both lost and found, unmade and rebuilt, crooked and beautiful.

Last Boat out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese who Fled Mao's Revolution by Helen Zia. The dramatic, real-life stories of four young people caught up in the mass exodus of Shanghai in the wake of China's 1949 Communist Revolution--a precursor to the struggles faced by emigrants today. Shanghai has historically been China's jewel, its richest, most modern and westernized city. The bustling metropolis was home to sophisticated intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and a thriving middle class when Mao's proletarian revolution emerged victorious from the long civil war. Terrified of the horrors the Communists would wreak upon their lives, citizens of Shanghai who could afford to fled in every direction. Seventy years later, the last generation to fully recall this massive exodus have opened the story to Chinese American journalist Helen Zia, who interviewed hundreds of exiles about their journey through one of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century. From these moving accounts, Zia weaves the story of four young Shanghai residents who wrestled with the decision to abandon everything for an uncertain life as refugees in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the U.S.

Front Desk by Kelly Yang. This big-hearted novel follows Mia, a young immigrant who lives at a motel where her parents are employed. Mia works at the front desk and uses her new-found writing voice to stand up for herself, her family, and the other immigrants and guests at the motel. 

The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi. A tender story of a young Korean girl and her concerns about acceptance and identity upon joining an American school. Unhei tells her new classmates that she will choose an American name from the ones they suggest and imagines what life will be like as a Suzy or Amanda. Throughout the book, Unhei experiences many conflicting pressures from wanting to be like her classmates to desiring to please her family. Ultimately, Unhei realizes the beauty and value of her own name, and she chooses to keep that name even with her new, American friends.

The Bad Muslim Discount by Syed M. Masood. It is 1995, and Anvar Faris is a restless, rebellious, and sharp-tongued boy doing his best to grow up in Karachi, Pakistan. As fundamentalism takes root within the social order and the zealots next door attempt to make Islam great again, his family decides, not quite unanimously, to start life over in California. Ironically, Anvar's deeply devout mother and his model-Muslim brother adjust easily to life in America, while his fun-loving father can't find anyone he relates to. For his part, Anvar fully commits to being a bad Muslim. At the same time, thousands of miles away, Safwa, a young girl living in war-torn Baghdad with her grief-stricken, conservative father will find a very different and far more dangerous path to America. When Anvar and Safwa's worlds collide as two remarkable, strong-willed adults, their contradictory, intertwined fates will rock their community, and families, to their core.

Did You Know?

Kanopy Database has instructional videos!

Kanopy Database has instructional videos!

Log in to Kanopy using Google and your NICC account to view instructional videos on various topics, including Food Technology, Technical Expertise, and K-12 Lessons!

Did You Know?: NICC CIS Help Page

Log into any campus computer (and the WiFi on mobile devices!) with your NICC username and password!

Your NICC username is the first part of your email before the @ symbol (i.e. smithj1234). Use the same password as your email!

Questions? Contact the CIS Helpdesk at (844) 642 - 2338, Ext. 555, or helpdesk@nicc.edu.

New NICC Library Web Cameras

Borrow Web Cameras at NICC Libraries

NICC Libraries now have web cameras available for you to check out. Click on the link to see if a camera is currently available.

NICC Student ID

You can request an NICC ID ONLINE!

You will need to upload a photo of yourself to be used on the ID. PLEASE, make sure the photo is in color, shows your whole head and neck (no hats or sunglasses), and doesn't include anyone else in the frame. Failure to follow these guidelines will result in a delay in printing.

Summer Hours

Books On the Move

Picture books can now be found at the front of the Peosta library!

New books can be found at the front of the Peosta Library.

Click this link to browse by subject.